Judge Greenlights Gravesend Bay Waste Transfer Station, Tossing Colton Lawsuit

The incineration plant and landfill dump at Gravesend Bay in 1973, now the site at the center of a major Bensonhurst environmental debate. (Source: Source: Arthur Tress via DailyDOCUMERICA)
The incineration plant and landfill dump at Gravesend Bay in 1973, now the site at the center of a major Bensonhurst environmental debate. (Source: Source: Arthur Tress via DailyDOCUMERICA)

The ruling of a State Supreme Court justice set back the efforts of those opposed to the building of a new waste transfer station in Gravesend Bay. Justice Bert Bunyan dismissed concerns put forward Assemblyman William Colton but ordered for greater transparency in the construction of the station from the Department of Sanitation.

As we’ve previously reported, opponents of the station, including Colton, argued that the construction of a new waste transfer station would dredge up dangerous toxic chemicals left by an older city trash incinerator that previously occupied the spot. Colton had also argued that the streets would be clogged with garbage trucks.

According to a Brooklyn Daily report, Justice Bunyan dismissed those concerns. Bunyan cited  that traffic was never a problem when Gravesend Bay previously hosted the incinerator. The judge also expressed his belief that in constructing the waste transfer station, the city would take care in making sure that the surrounding community would be protected.

The judge did order that the Department of Sanitation keep the public updated on all construction efforts and future maintenance plans.

“Transparency through timely and adequate disclosure is necessary as a prophylactic measure designed to ward off any future litigation about this project,” Bunyan wrote.

Although Bunyan’s decision gives the city the go ahead to build the station, DOS has not yet issued plans for construction.

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