Greenfield Slams MTA Over F Train

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The ‘F’ in F-Train stands for failure, at least according to Councilman David Greenfield. The councilman hammered the MTA over the shoddy service the F has been offering residents of Southern Brooklyn and questioned the metrics they use for jacking up fees, according to a press release.

During a City Council Transportation Committee meeting, Greenfield told the MTA that he is constantly besieged with with complaints about F-train service from his constituents, ranging from constant delays and malfunctioning signal problems. Greenfield also asked if the MTA was considering restoring an express F line in the near future now that the Culver Viaduct is nearing completion.

“Barely a day goes by without yet another delay along the F train, which is a vital link to Manhattan for many residents of Southern Brooklyn. I am pleased that the MTA agreed to review my request to restore express service along this critical line, and I am hopeful that the promised review of the F train will lead to significant service improvements in the near future,” Greenfield said in the press release.

Greenfield also questioned how the MTA comes up with its fare hikes, focusing in on the heavy increases drivers have been facing on bridges and tolls like the Verrazano-Narrows.

“It seems like recent fare increases have disproportionally fallen on the backs of drivers who now face extremely high tolls on many local bridges and tunnels. It’s $15 to cross the Verrazano and $7.50 to use the Battery Tunnel. That’s a lot of money for most New Yorkers. The MTA needs to realize that many Brooklyn residents rely on their car to get to work or to run errands, especially in areas not served by public transportation, so it is imperative that the MTA institute these hikes in a fair and even manner,” Greenfield said.

Greenfield remains hopeful his prodding of the MTA will lead to better F-train service, a return of the express F line and other service improvements. After all, all that extra money the MTA is collecting from increased fares is going somewhere, right?

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