New Markers Commemorate DUMBO’s Historic District Designation

New Markers Commemorate DUMBO’s Historic District Designation

DUMBO – There’s more to DUMBO than just being the most Instagrammed spot in the borough. The picturesque neighborhood located “Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass” was designated a historic district by the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) in 2007, and on Friday morning, a historic district marker was unveiled providing visitors with a synopsis of the locale’s industrial, architectural, and cultural past.

The unveiling of the DUMBO Historic District Marker. L-R: Doreen Gallo (DUMBO Neighborhood Alliance), Sarah Carroll (LPC), Christina Davis (NYLPF Co-Chair), Basil Walter (NYLPF Co-Chair), and Council Member Stephen Levin. (Photo: Nathan Haselby)

On Jay Street between Water and Plymouth Streets this morning, the LPC, the New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation (NYLPF), the DUMBO Neighborhood Alliance, and Council Member Stephen Levin unveiled one of three newly installed markers that will promote and commemorate the designation of the DUMBO Historic District, detailing the neighborhood’s historic importance as well as its boundaries.

The terra cotta-colored signs measure 19″ x 36″ and feature a map of the district on one side and a brief description and history of DUMBO on the other. The installation of the DUMBO markers is part of the NYLPF’s Historic District Marker Program, which uses signage to promote public awareness and civic pride in designated NYC historic districts.

DUMBO Historic District Marker (Photo: Nathan Haselby)
DUMBO Historic District Marker (Photo: Nathan Haselby)

“By the early 20th century, Brooklyn was the fourth largest manufacturing center in the entire country and a significant amount of this industrial output occurred right here in DUMBO,” LPC’s Executive Director, Sarah Carroll, said at Friday’s event. “The Landmarks Preservation Commission designated DUMBO a historic district in 2007 to recognize its rich history and its unique industrial streetscapes. DUMBO, being one of the most important manufacturing centers, has one of the finest and most varied collections of 19th century and early 20th century industrial architecture in New York City and it embodies an important era in both Brooklyn and New York City history. Even as building uses have evolved throughout the years, this dynamic neighborhood has retained its industrial character.”

NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission’s Executive Director, Sarah Carroll (Photo: Nathan Haselby)

Council Member Stephen Levin, whose District 33 covers DUMBO, acknowledged the Historic Districts Council and the DUMBO Neighborhood Alliance for their work in the community. “As our city changes, our city evolves…we need to make sure that we are always keeping our preservation and our history and our heritage on the front burner.”

Council Member Stephen Levin (Photo: Nathan Haselby)

“It’s really important, especially in a neighborhood like DUMBO,” Levin continued, “where you can see the history of the community…. You can see how this community was used 150 years ago. In the case of DUMBO, you can see the train tracks where the carting happened, the taking of the wares off the waterfront and bringing it to the population of Brooklyn.”

Doreen Gallo, President of the DUMBO Neighborhood Alliance (Photo: Nathan Haselby)

Longtime DUMBO resident and President of the DUMBO Neighborhood Alliance, Doreen Gallo, worked with the Council Member and the city agencies in developing the historic district markers. “We extend our gratitude to the Landmarks Preservation Commission as well as the New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation for this crucial recognition of our historic district designation in 2007. As our neighborhood continues to expand and evolve, it remains paramount that we continue to educate the public as to the growing need for historic preservation.”

“The marker that we are unveiling today will memorialize the Commission’s designation of this historic district and let New Yorkers and visitors alike know about DUMBO’s architectural and historic importance,” LPC Executive Director Carroll noted.

L-R: Doreen Gallo (DUMBO Neighborhood Alliance), Sarah Carroll (LPC), Christina Davis (NYLPF Co-Chair), Basil Walter (NYLPF Co-Chair), and Council Member Stephen Levin. (Photo: Nathan Haselby)

Founded in 1965, the Landmarks Preservation Commission protects and preserves NYC’s architecturally, historically, and culturally significant structures and sites. LPC has granted landmark status to more than 36,000 buildings and sites, including 1,413 individual landmarks, 120 interior landmarks, 11 scenic landmarks, and 143 historic districts and extensions across the city.

To learn more about DUMBO and to read the DUMBO Historic District Designation Report, click here.

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