City Council Passes Legislation To Reduce Citywide Speed Limit; Councilman Jumaane Williams Criticizes It As ‘Too Broad’

25 mph speed limit

The New York City Council yesterday passed legislation that reduces the citywide speed limit on residential streets from 30 miles per hour to 25 mph, a move that lawmakers and advocates said would, if properly enforced, dramatically reduce traffic-related injuries and fatalities.

After state legislators voted in June to allow the city to lower the speed limit, the Council approved the bill, sponsored by Councilman David Greenfield, that aims to slow vehicles on streets where speed limits are not posted – meaning roads overseen by the state Department of Transportation (such as expressways and parkways) will not be affected. The reduction is part of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Vision Zero initiative, which aims to dramatically curb traffic injuries and deaths over the next decade.

“Reducing the default speed limit in New York City is the lynchpin of Vision Zero,” Greenfield said in a statement to the press.

City officials said they plan to launch a three week publicity campaign about the speed reduction on Monday, according to the New York Times, and the new speed limit will go into effect on Nov. 7.

The nonprofit Transportation Alternatives too backed the Council’s move, saying “if properly enforced, the new speed limit could prevent more than 6,500 traffic injuries in the next year and cut the annual number of pedestrian fatalities in half.”

The group urged de Blasio to quickly give his stamp of approval to the bill – which the mayor is expected to do and sent out his own statement praising the Council’s vote – and stressed that the NYPD and city Department of Transportation need “to send a stronger message about the dangers of speeding by continuing to improve traffic enforcement and public information initiatives.”

“Unsafe driver speed is the number one cause of traffic deaths in the city, killing more New Yorkers than drunk driving and cell phone use at the wheel combined,” Transportation Alternatives said in the same statement. “A pedestrian hit by a driver going 25 mph is twice as likely to survive as a person hit at 30mph.”

While Councilman Jumaane Williams, who represents our neighborhood, was in Cleveland for the vote (where he’s working with city officials there to help implement an anti-violence campaign similar to the one he launched here), he said in a statement Tuesday he would have voted against it.

“I fully support the need to reform traffic laws in New York City, and the majority of proposals offered in ‘Vision Zero,'” Williams said. “When the issue of the citywide reduction previously came before the Council, I voted to give the City discretion on lowering the speed limit, since I believed the City deserved to make this decision. At the same time, I believe that this legislation is too broad in the form passed today and I would have voted against it.”

“Instead of an overall speed limit reduction, the better approach is to study the City’s various neighborhoods and major arteries and assess, with specificity, where a lower speed limit makes the most practical sense,” Williams continued. “For example, it makes sense to carve out school zones as necessary places to have a lower speed limit, as many young people populate these areas. Many side streets and other ‘Slow Zones’ in my district would also benefit from a lower limit. In fact, I would vehemently support lowering the speed limit on many residential streets in my district – with some areas even lower than 25 mph.

Williams goes on to say that he will “continue to support increased enforcement, through speed cameras and stepped-up enforcement of current traffic rules and regulations, and have consistently done so.

“We owe it to the families and victims to not only do something, but to get it right. My prayers for peace and comfort are with those families as we strive to do so,” the councilman said.

To see a copy of the bill, you can go here.

Photo via Governor Andrew Cuomo.

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Anna Gustafson

Editor of Ditmas Park Corner

Comments

  1. I cannot think of a single non expressway or parkway road in the city that would not benefit from having the speed limit reduced to 25. I do not agree with Jumaane that we should spend millions of dollars studying something with an obvious answer, and making everything exponentially more complicated and spend millions more dollars on the infrastructure to support that. I think there are much more important things to do with our money than impede laws that will save lives. I cannot fathom what the other point of view could possibly be and I learned nothing from his above statement.

  2. I agree with Jumaane. This is a broad brush attempt to increase safety, without getting to the bottom of the real problem: the culture that it’s OK to violate vehicle traffic laws besides speed: failure to yield to pedestrians in crosswalks, illegal u-turns, double parking considered a “right” forcing excessive lane changing, running STOP signs and red lights, by cars and bikes, etc. Dropping the speed limit to 25 is not going to change the culture. If anything, it will increase driver frustration and cause more of these kinds of infractions, and more injuries. What will change the culture is extensive re-education, reminding motorists that these behaviors must change, followed up by much more enforcement, by police and cameras.

  3. Don’t you see it people? it’s all for the money. Do you know how many violation tickets this law will make happen? and how much money the city will collect from this? Our safety, yeah right.

  4. You’re right. Instead of trying to get people to drive correctly, they’d rather have them drive just as badly, only slower.

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