Southern Brooklyn

Sign Series: Junk Law-ns

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unsolicited ad 877 junkLooks like 877 Junk Law (odd name, sounds a little like a telephone number), operating online from their “control address” in Brighton Beach, has made a bold business out of New York State Law Chap. 585, Sec. 1, Paragraph 397-a.

The law was passed in August 15, 2007 to help residents who were tired of the collection of flyers and pamphlets at their front door.

If you don’t want to know what’s on sale at your local supermarket a week ahead of time, you’ll need to inform the person with the bag full of leaflets. To do that, you’ll need a bright, bold sign visible from the street. Without a prominently placed sign, you won’t be able to make a complaint to the city about the businesses that continue to leave their advertisements.

You can make your own sign, but it will have to follow specific guidelines. It’s your choice: would you like to have a bright yellow metal sign blaring its message or would you prefer to have a slew of Marketeers on your front stoop advertising that you’re on your summer vacation? It’s not that Brooklyn push-in robbers really mind if you’re home. Lately, they seem to prefer that someone is there to open the door — saves them the trouble of having to break in.

[This homeowner on East 19 St, where this photo was snapped might also need one of the other frequently ignored signs: No Littering. That’s a plastic bag, not snow.]

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