Real Estate

Key Food On Lafayette Avenue Will Close To Make Way For Housing Tower

key food 325 lafayette copy
The rumors are true: the Key Food at 325 Lafayette Avenue (between Grand and Classon Avenues) will be closing after decades of serving the Clinton Hill community.

A final closing date has not yet been set, but landlord Richard Grobman “confirmed that the plan is to make way for housing with underground parking,” stated Public Advocate Letitia James, who is herself a neighborhood resident. “The future of whether or not the store will return is not certain at this time,” she said.

Buyer Slate Property Group has not finalized the purchase yet, but the plan, according to Principal David Schwartz in a statement to Crain’s, is to build an eight-story, 110-unit residential building with 20 percent of the rental units designated “affordable.”

Residents we spoke with are unanimous in their hope that any development on the site — which might include the New Lucky Laundromat next door at 323 Lafayette Avenue — will incorporate a supermarket.

“The three Mitchell Lama buildings along Lafayette Ave have very large senior populations, where would they shop if Key Food closes,” asked Leslie Sierra, president of the Pratt Towers Board of Directors. “I’m physically able to [walk or drive] somewhere else, but what about seniors and those with disabilities?”

Between the Mitchell Lama co-ops alone, Sierra noted, there are nearly 1,000 families who would be affected — none of whom were consulted about a possible sale’s impact on them.

“This has already occurred on [490] Myrtle Avenue, when Associated Supermarket closed, and that too was a great loss,” Sierra said. “People are in complete shock that this could happen with no one knowing, no community input.”

That Associated Supermarket is slated to reopen in the near future, once construction is complete at the site.

Asked where she would go to shop if another market doesn’t replace Key Food, Sierra said it would be “a difficult decision” between “smaller markets on DeKalb Avenue and the Pathmark at Atlantic Terminal,” which is much farther away.

The next closest supermarket is a C-Town at DeKalb Avenue and Taaffe Place.

Olanike Alabi, Democratic District Leader for the 57th Assembly District, also shops at the Key Food and said “many developers must recognize that in their quest to build and make a profit, they cannot inconvenience residents by eliminating services such as gas stations and supermarkets.”

Although the sale seems to be a done deal, Grobman, the landlord, “is willing to meet [with the community] and discuss options,” said Public Advocate James.

“Clearly, many will be affected and the goal at this time is for all of us to work together for what will clearly be a great inconvenience,” she said.

Update: A town hall meeting will be held on Monday, February 23 at 6pm at 309 Lafayette Avenue.

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13 COMMENTS

  1. When is the building going to stop? We have lived in this neighborhood for over 50 years and now it has become open season on building with no community input. Is this the wave of the future, if so it is not without opposition. There are so many new developments in downtown Brooklyn that it is hard to remember what Brooklyn looked like. Is this really necessary? Please stop the madness.

  2. Although it may not be “necessary,” the landlord has a right to build whatever the law allows.

    If you don’t like it, work to change the (zoning) rules governing this land. However, the DeBlasio administration wants more housing built, so that would be a tough sell. And it’s too late, anyway.

    P.S. Do you think there was “community input” for the building that you live in? Probably not.

  3. Gentrification has no compassion for the small people all they care about is padding their pockets. Just look around, this neighborhood is little Manhattan now. Its overcrowded. Also stop lying to the people by calling these new ugly condos “affordable housing”. Im making my way out of FtGreene soon, the suits and yuppies can have it.

  4. WHERE ARE THE POLITITIONS IN THIS AREA? HOW COME THE PEOPLE IN THIS AREA HAD NO INPUT IN THIS MATTER? WHY DO WE CONTINUE TO VOTE FOR THESE PEOPLE AND THEY DO NOTHING FOR THE COMMUNITY AT LARGE. LITISHA JAMES/ WHY DID YOU DO NOTHING? YOU ARE SUPPOSED TO BE THE PUBLIC ADVOCATE!!. OLANIKE ALABI OF THE 57TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT/ WHAT HAS HE DONE TO INFORM THE PUBLIC ABOUT THIS/ NOTHING!!!
    I SUGGEST THE NEXT TIME THESE TWO PEOPLE COME AROUND FOR VOTES IN THE NEXT ELECTION, YOU VOTE FOR SOMEONE ELSE. THESE TWO HAVE DONE NOTHING FOR YOU. SHAME ON THEM!!!!

  5. What about Walter Mosley our assemblyman please don’t leave anyone out just think of another ugly building that doesn’t fit in

  6. Methodist Hospital in Park Slope wants to expand and the community is against it because they were aware of what was happening in their neighborhood. That leaves the question, What About Us? I found out when my daughter who lives in Maryland sent a facebook story and I live right here.

  7. Focus’s story leaves out the single salient element in this development deal, that it’s going forward on leased land. By retaining title, the owner, Dan’s Supermarkets, stays in the game and makes money, at the same time giving a break on the single biggest cost to a developer: purchasing the land. The developer, Slate, is quoted as saying they wouldn’t be able to build on this pricey site if they had to buy it.

    Compare this win-win to the public fleecing NYC intends to consummate very soon with the sale of 15 Lafayette Avenune (next to Mark Morris, across the street from BAM) to the Jonathan Rose Companies for $1.00.

    The property at present belongs to the City, to us. The City, not we, is giving our $50,000,000 holding to a favored contributor/developer because he will kick in a few “affordable” units among the de luxe apartments the high rise will make his return on — and after 30 years the affordable will be reclassified and if the residents haven’t become rlch by then, they’ll be thrown out.

    15 Lafayette is only one of hudreds of lots City Hall is giving to developer friends in the name of affordable housing. Ask anyone involved and they’ll say with a straight face, we have to save the developer the expense of the land or we won’t get our affordable housing.

    In this insanely hot market, the REBNY crowd appreciates such elemosinariousness in their stead. They are grateful any time they don’t have to shell out $100,000,000, like for the LIRR yards or $50,000,000 for 15 Lafayette (grateful developers in these cases, Bruce Ratner and Jonathan Rose).

    Call the Mayor on Monday and ask him why he’s selling us out at 15 Lafayette and he’ll tell you it has to be this way to get affordable housing. But Dan’s Supermarkets and Slate developer are showing us how to hang onto our valuable real estate and still get good affordable built.

    Dan’s and Slate are showing us we owners can make money by leasing and the developer can afford to construct good affordable housing on leased land. Dan’s has shown us tax payer/owners that we don’t have to be defrauded to make way for middle class housing.

    Dan’s for Mayor, anyone?

  8. that not true, I am a witness that Letisha at one time was on the battlefield for downtown Brooklyn, so I don’t know what Rock you was under….

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